Albert camus the stranger absurdism essay

Printed in Studies in Critical Philosophy.

the stranger absurdism and existentialism

In writing The Stranger, Albert Camus championed the idea of existentialism, a philosophy he truly believed in it. In dwelling on the chance of an appeal, he is forced to consider the possibility of denial and thus of execution; therefore, he must face the fact of his death — whether it comes now or later.

The fictional characters, therefore, who shoulder their new mortal responsibility, are often characterized as rebels.

The stranger sparknotes

The philosophy or theory of Existentialism is somewhat controversial, but nonetheless in many respects it has some notable and legitimate points. Much like Kafka's Joseph K. In this connection, it must be admitted that he is externally very sensitive and aware, despite his lack of self-understanding and emotional response. Death to him is just one less person to worry about on this earth. This perspective undoubtedly set the foundation for his adoption of the theory of existentialism. Page numbers refer to a later paperback edition. In this sense, all human activity is absurd, and the real freedom is to be aware of life in its actually and totally, of its beauty and its pain. The idea of death makes one aware of one's life, one's vital being — that which is impermanent and will one day end. Death marks all things equal, and equally absurd. To Meursault nothing will matter so he lives a simple life with simple needs. In other words, her death has little or no real significance for him. The central theme is that the significance of human life is understood only in light of mortality, or the fact of death; and in showing Meursault's consciousness change through the course of events, Camus shows how facing the possibility of death does have an effect on one's perception of life. The novel begins with the death of Meursault's mother.

He flies into rage, finally, at the chaplain's persistence, for he realizes that the chaplain has not adequately assessed the human condition death being the end of life — or, if he has, the chaplain's certainties have no meaning for Meursault and have not the real value of, say, a strand of a woman's hair To Meursault nothing will matter so he lives a simple life with simple needs.

Camus, founder of absurdism and French Nobel Prize winning author, sends the reader his underlying theme that life is meaningless and has no ulti-mate significance.

He even says that if forced to live in a hollow tree truck, he would be content to watch the sky, passing birds, and clouds In this connection, it must be admitted that he is externally very sensitive and aware, despite his lack of self-understanding and emotional response.

albert camus essays

Of course, the "meaning" of another's death is quite difference from the "meaning" of one's own death. Meursault, on the other hand, is absolutely certain about his own life and forthcoming death.

what does meursault realize at the end of the stranger

Also, he fails to show any form of regret or thought to his murder of the Arab, or to attempt to find reason as to why he killed the man.

Rated 6/10 based on 43 review
Download
Camus and the Absurd